Program researched and developed by UDocs in collaboration with NVision Insight Group

NVision Insight Group is a majority Indigenous-owned consulting company with First Nations, Inuit and Métis shareholders and staff. With offices in Ottawa and Iqaluit, NVision provides expertise in planning, research, and learning, including Indigenous cultural awareness courses. UDocs and NVision are working together to ensure that all Indigenous Intercultural Competency courses offered by UDocs has been developed with Indigenous input and perspectives.
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Last Resort Course Reviews

5 star rating

I loved the different parts that were brought together th...

Val Napoleon

This covered a range of important issues and questions.

This covered a range of important issues and questions.

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5 star rating

thoughtful

Rebecca Johnson

I enjoyed being able to see the land while discussing the case. I also found it helpful to return to segments of the film during the panel discussion

I enjoyed being able to see the land while discussing the case. I also found it helpful to return to segments of the film during the panel discussion

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5 star rating

Informative

Jennifer David

I learned a lot by taking this course, including some concepts and legal perspectives that I had not heard before.

I learned a lot by taking this course, including some concepts and legal perspectives that I had not heard before.

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  • Designed for: Lawyers, Accountants and other Professionals

  • Accredited: (1 hour 45 mins EDI Professionalism by LSO)

  • Duration: 1 hour 45 mins

  • Program Language: English

  • Program Fee: $149

  • Closed Caption available: English

Course Summary

About the Documentary Case Study

An exploration of the precedent-setting case Ktunaxa Nation v. British Columbia which sees the first ever Indigenous freedom of religion challenge to go before the Supreme Court of Canada. This program aims to improve Indigenous intercultural competencies for professionals by learning about Indigenous history, culture, land and spirituality. This course aims to support the Calls to Action (CTA) stipulated in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, mainly CTA #27 and CTA #28 that aim at providing anti-racism and Indigenous intercultural competency training to lawyers and law students.


Program Objective

The overall objective of this course is to support anti-racism and develop Indigenous intercultural competencies for legal professionals by learning about Indigenous history, culture, land and spirituality. 

This course supports the Calls to Action (CTAs) stipulated in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, 2012 (TRC) (see here). Specifically, calls to action in relation to providing Indigenous intercultural competency training to legal professionals and law students, as well as all business and professionals in general (e.g., Calls to action #27 (lawyers), #28 (law students), #57 (public servants), #92 (private sector executives) - as stated in the TRC calls to action in relation to professional development: “to ensure that professionals receive appropriate cultural competency training, which includes the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Treaties and Aboriginal rights, Indigenous law, and Aboriginal– Crown relations. This will require skills-based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights, and anti-racism.”


Specific Learning Objectives

  • Understanding of the practical meaning of reconciliation from an Indigenous perspective;

  • Understanding Indigenous Spirituality – better understanding of what the definition of spirituality is based on Indigenous cultures and traditions;

  • Understanding the importance of preserving Indigenous spirituality in the context of Indigenous resurgence;

  • Understanding the Indigenous assertion that land rights are human rights; and

  • Understanding that decolonization means the recognition of the legal sovereignty for Indigenous Peoples, in other words that Indigenous nations have always had laws and justice, and that these are rooted in, and arise from, their land.

Subject Matter Experts

 

Dr. Val Napoleon
Director, JD/JID program, Associate professor, Law Foundation Chair of Indigenous Justice and Governance, Faculty of Law, University of Victoria


Val Napoleon was appointed the Law Foundation Professor of Aboriginal Justice and Governance at the Faculty of Law, University of Victoria on January 1, 2012. She is from northeast British Columbia (Treaty 8) and a member of Saulteau First Nation. She is also an adopted member of the Gitanyow (Gitksan) House of Luuxhon, Ganada (Frog) Clan. Prior to joining the Faculty of Law at UVic, she is an associate professor cross appointed with the faculties of Native Studies and Law at the University of Alberta.

She worked as a community activist and consultant in northwestern BC for over 25 years, specializing in health, education, and justice issues. She have also worked with a number of regional, provincial, national, and international projects relating to indigenous legal traditions, conflict management, education, and citizenship. Her dissertation on Gitksan law and legal theory was awarded the UVic Governor General's Gold Medal for best dissertation in 2009.

Her current research focuses on indigenous legal traditions, indigenous legal theory, indigenous feminism, citizenship, self-determination, and governance. Some of her major initiatives include the proposed JID (joint JD and indigenous law degree) program, establishing the Indigenous Law Research Unit, and a collaborative national reconciliation and justice with the Indigenous Bar Association, Truth and Reconciliation, and the Ontario Law Foundation.

She has taught and published on aboriginal legal issues, indigenous legal theory, indigenous feminist legal studies, self-government, critical issues in restorative justice, oral traditions, and contemporary aboriginal issues. I also teach property law.

 


 

Kathryn Teneese
Director/Chief Negotiator at Ktunaxa Nation Council. Ktunaxa Nation Council. Cranbrook, British Columbia


Ms. Kathryn Teneese is the Ktunaxa Nation Chair as well as Chief Negotiator for the ongoing treaty negotiations with Canada and British Columbia.


Ms. Teneese’s active participation in public service began in the late 1960’s at the Columbia Lake Band (now known as the Akisq’nuk First Nation) as a Band Councillor and Band Manager, and then later as the Area Coordinator for the organization now known as the Ktunaxa Nation Council.

She was also employed in the area of Adult Education at EKCC, now the College of the Rockies.

From 1981 to 1998 Ms. Teneese lived away from the area to pursue employment at a senior level with a number of provincial Aboriginal organizations based in Vancouver. She returned to the Ktunaxa amakis (territory) in August 1998.

Ms. Teneese’ s recent public service includes being a member of the First Nations Summit Task Group, serving as the Chair of the New Relationship Trust and most recently, as a member of the British Columbia Climate Solutions and Clean Growth Advisory Council.


Course curriculum

  • 1

    Last Resort - Original Documentary Film Case Study

    • Last Resort - full movie

  • 2

    Last Resort - The Experts Weigh In

    • Last Resort - experts - Kathryn Teneese

    • Last Resort - experts - Dr. Val Napoleon

  • 3

    Last Resort- Post-Screening Quiz

    • Last Resort - quiz